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Kanata Drive - Kanata Drive is named as part of a section of town bearing Indian names. In 1535, two Indian youths told Jacques Cartier about the route to “Kanata.” They were referring to the village of Stadacona; Kanata was simply the Huron-Iroquois Nations word for village, “kanata” to refer to the country he had encountered, Canad. Thus,the close proximity of the Iroquois Road and Huron Drive shows the connection of the name to the Indians.

Karnoustie Way - Karnoustie Way is most likely a variation of the spelling for Carnoustie in Tayside, Scotland. Some sportscasters have spelled Carnoustie as Karnoustie, hence the mix-up. It is a small town (pop.10,200) with golf links at the mouth of the Barry Burn on the east coast of Scotland, in the District of Angus. Golf is recorded as having been played here as early as 1527, which was earlier than at St Andrews, where the first record of golf dates from 1552. The original course was ten holes, crossing and recrossing the burn. The opening of the coastal railway from Dundee to Arbroath in 1838 brought an influx of golfers from as far away as Edinburgh, anxious to tackle the ancient links. This led to a complete restructuring of the course, extended in 1867 by Old Tom Morris, to eighteen holes, which had become the standard. The town of Carnoustie was founded only towards the end of the eighteenth century. In 1890, the Earl of Dalhousie, who owned the land, sold the links to the people of the town to be kept available for their recreation in perpetuity. While the townspeople are the owners, today the links are administered on their behalf by Angus District Council. Two additional courses have since been added - the Burnside Course and the shorter, though equally testing Buddon Links. Carnoustie first played host to The Open Championship in 1931, after modifications to the course by James Braid in 1926. The winner then was Tommy Armour, from Edinburgh, Scotland. Later Open winners at Carnoustie were the Englishman Henry Cotton in 1936, Ben Hogan (USA, in 1953), Gary Player (South Africa, 1968), Tom Watson (USA, 1976) and Paul Lawrie (Aberdeenshire, 1999). In North America, the course is nicknamed "Car-Nasty" due to the famously difficult conditions. The term "Carnoustie effect" dates from the 1999 Open, when many of the world's best players, reared on smooth American courses, were frustrated by the unexpected difficulties of the links. Whereas major championships are usually won by scores well under par, at Carnoustie the winning score in 1999 was six strokes over par. One much-fancied young favorite went straight from the course to his mother's arms in tears. That Open may best be remembered for the epic collapse of French golfer Jean Van de Velde, who needed only a 6 on the par-4 18th hole to win the Open-and proceeded to shoot a triple-bogey 7, eventually losing a playoff to Lawrie. The Open Championship will be played at Carnoustie again in 2007. The "Carnoustie effect" is defined as "that degree of mental and psychic shock experienced on collision with reality by those whose expectations are founded on false assumptions." This being a psychological term, it can of course apply to disillusionment in any area of activity, not just in golf.

Kathy Drive - Kathy Drive is named after Katherine Winn. She was the majorette of the award-winning 1948 VFW military band. She was well known in Nashua as being both peppy and high-spirited.

Katie Lane - On Katie Lane, the first house built was by the White family, whose ancestors lived in the area for quite awhile. William White is credited with inventing the wool washer, wool feeding device, and wool dryer. Great-grandfather Charles F. White was born in 1815 in Hillsborough Co., NH (family knowledge). This was shown on an 1855 "proving up" document on a Washington Territory donation land claim that also revealed that he had a brother, George H. White, and a sister, Sarah Jane White (he had named them as "heirs in law"). These siblings had not accompanied Charles west as his party consisted of wife Elizabeth Buchanan, whom he had married in Indiana, a six year old son, Sylvanus, and a brother-in-law, Michael Buchanan. It is highly likely that the street was named after a daughter or relative.

Keats Street - Keats Street is named after John Keats. He was an English poet born in London (1795-1821). He is considered one of the greatest of English poets a leader in romanticism. His poems include “Ode on a Grecian Urn,” “Ode to a Nightingale,” and “Endymion,” which contains the famous line “A thing of beauty is a joy forever.” The son of a livery stable keeper, Keats attended school at Enfield, where he became the friend of Charles Cowden Clarke, the headmaster's son, who encouraged his early learning. Apprenticed to a surgeon (1811), Keats came to know Leigh Hunt and his literary circle, and in 1816 he gave up surgery to write poetry. His first volume of poems appeared in 1817. It included “I stood tip-toe upon a little hill,” “Sleep and Poetry,” and the famous sonnet “On First Looking into Chapman's Homer.” Endymion, a long poem, was published in 1818. Although faulty in structure, it is nevertheless full of rich imagery and color. Keats returned from a walking tour in the Highlands to find himself attacked in Blackwood's Magazine-an article berated him for belonging to Leigh Hunt's “Cockney school” of poetry-and in the Quarterly Review. The critical assaults of 1818 mark a turning point in Keats's life; he was forced to examine his work more carefully, and as a result the influence of Hunt was diminished. However, these attacks did not contribute to Keats's decline in health and his early death, as Shelley maintained in his elegy “Adonais.” Keats's passionate love for Fanny Brawne seems to have begun in 1818. Fanny's letters to Keats's sister show that her critics' contention that she was a cruel flirt was not true. Only Keats's failing health prevented their marriage. He had contracted tuberculosis, probably from nursing his brother Tom, who died in 1818. With his friend, the artist Joseph Severn, Keats sailed for Italy shortly after the publication of Lamia, Isabella, The Eve of Street Agnes, and Other Poems (1820), which contains most of his important work and is probably the greatest single volume of poetry published in England in the 19th cent. He died in Rome in February, 1821, at the age of 25. In spite of his tragically brief career, Keats is one of the most important English poets. He is also among the most personally appealing. Noble, generous, and sympathetic, he was capable not only of passionate love but also of warm, steadfast friendship. Keats is ranked, with Shelley and Byron, as one of the three great Romantic poets. Such poems as “Ode to a Nightingale,” “Ode on a Grecian Urn,” “To Autumn,” and “Ode on Melancholy” are unequaled for dignity, melody, and richness of sensuous imagery. All of his poetry is filled with a mysterious and elevating sense of beauty and joy. Keats's posthumous pieces include “La Belle Dame sans Merci,” in its way as great an evocation of romantic medievalism as “The Eve of Street Agnes.” Among his sonnets, familiar ones are “When I have fears that I may cease to be” and “Bright star! would I were as steadfast as thou art.” “Lines on the Mermaid Tavern,” “Fancy,” and “Bards of Passion and of Mirth” are delightful short poems. Some of Keats's finest work is in the unfinished epic “Hyperion.” In recent years critical attention has focused on Keats's philosophy, which involves not abstract thought but rather absolute receptivity to experience. This attitude is indicated in his celebrated term “negative capability”-“to let the mind be a thoroughfare for all thought.

Keith Street - Keith Street was named after Jeremiah Keith. He served in the American Revolution and was from Dunstable. He went to Rhode Island as a volunteer with Col. Noah Lovewell.

Kehoe Avenue - Kehoe Avenue bears its name from a family in Nashua NH. Kehoe was once known for its “first class grocery store” here in Nashua. Today, many descendants live in the area.

Kelly Street - Kelly Street is named after a prominent family in New Hampshire, descendants of Moses Kelly (or Kelley) who later moved to Nashua. Moses Kelly settled first in Atkinson, New Hampshire near the limits of Salem. He was one of a committee, chosen on January 13, 1773, to give deeds of the pews in the meeting-house newly erected in Atkinson. The births of his children, except that of his youngest one, were recorded in that town, though two or three of the later ones were born after his removal from Atkinson. "Moses Kelly, gentleman,” of Atkinson, bought from Timothy Ferrin, of Goffstown NH, a tract of land in the latter town on May 7, 1773. He soon afterward removed to this spot and became interested in military matters. He owned a tavern and was a prominent local supporter of the "Sons of Liberty". His tavern, called "Kelley's Tavern" was located at the corner of Mast Road and Libby Street. It was here, in the early days of the Revolutionary War, meetings of the Sons of Liberty took place. Moses Kelly was a selectman and town moderator in Goffstown and was also a delegate to the county congress during the Revolutionary War. During the war he attained the rank of Colonel. As Lieut. Colonel his activities included - enlisted July 1, 1777; 5 days; alarm at Ticonderoga; colonel; enlisted August 6, 1778; 25 days; expedition to Rhode Island. Kelley Falls in Goffstown and Kelley Street in Manchester were both dedicated in his honor. His home is still standing and is the oldest house in the Pinardville section of Goffstown at the intersection of Mast Road and Fairview Street. In Henniker, on July 5, 1777, twenty-two men enlisted to form the larger part of a company known as the Second Company of the 9th New Hampshire regiment of militia, commanded by Col. Moses Kelly of Goffstown. Col. Kelly held the office of High Sheriff of Hillsborough County for thirty years (from 1775 to 1808). He received his appointment under the British Crown. “His appearance in court was imposing, dressed as he was in a scarlet coat, white vest, buff-colored breeches and white top boots. He also wore a cocked hat and a gold hilted sword." From Goffstown, Col. Kelly moved to Hopkington, NH. Many of his descendants live on in his memory.

Kendall Way - Kendall Way is named for an early settler of Dunstable. The last name, Kendall, appears in a local graveyard. The Kendall family has been prominent throughout Nashua history. Hannah Jewett Kendall, a resident of Nashua, died on April 16, 1861. Rebekah, also from Nashua, died on June 10, 1840. Later records indicate that the family moved to Bedford, but Eliza Kendall later married Mr. Emerson, who lived in Nashua. The family made many contributions to the city. J. Norman Kendall invented a machine for cutting elastics for shoes and cutting stiffening for shoes. Another member of the family, P. A. Kendall manufactured and dealt in all kinds of saws on 20 Railroad Square.

Kendrick Street - Kendrick Street is named for a prominent family in Nashua. Rev. William P. Kendrick, who came from Dunstable, had a college education at Harvard. Stephen Kendrick was elected as General Court Representative in 1838. Also, the street could be named for the owner of the famous Kendrick and Tuttle store on the corner of Main and Amherst. Stephen Kendrick ran one of the earliest stores in Nashua where they sold imported English and French woolens. John Kendrick and Stephen Kendrick were part of a meeting to sign a charter from the New Hampshire Legislature for the Nashua Manufacturing Company. John Kendrick took fifteen shares of the company.

Kenmare Road - Kenmare Road is named after a small town (ca. 1200 inhabitants by 2004) in the south of County Kerry, Ireland. Since many of the Irish immigrants might have come from the area, the name comes from this small town. It lies on 2 of the more famous Irish tourist attractions, namely the Ring of Kerry and the Ring of Beara, approximately 22 miles (38 km) from Killarney. Kenmare has a population of 1844 (CSO 2002). The modern town was laid out in about 1670 by the English nobleman Sir William Petty, 1st Marquis of Lansdowne. The three main streets that form a triangle in the centre of the town were called William Street (now called Main Street), Henry Street (after the son of William) and Shelbourne Street, which was named after the Earl of Shelbourne. However, the area has more ancient roots. There is one of the biggest stone circles in Ireland very close to the town showing occupation by Celtic peoples long before English occupation. Vikings are said to have raided the area. Another name for Kenmare is Head of the Sea, which is believed to have been given to the area by the Vikings and translated into the Irish 'Ceann Mara' and hence corrupted by the English into Kenmare. It is rather famous for the lace work of a nunnery situated in town.

Kennedy Street - Kennedy Street was named for John F. Kennedy, who came to Nashua in 1960. He started his campaign trail to the White House with his presidential candidacy announcement in front of City Hall. Later, a bust was put in front of City Hall in memory of the event. The Telegraph reported that it was stolen, but it was recovered from someone’s basement.

Kent Lane - Kent Lane is named for a man that owned a prominent business in Nashua, NH. J. E. Kent sold dry and fancy goods and notions at 23 Factory Street. The store was founded in 1866 and the proprietor was native of New York State, but was well-known personally in Nashua. He served in both branches of the city council, which made him very well respected.

Kern Drive - Kern Drive is named after an American composer, Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 - November 11, 1945) considered to be part of the “Songwriter’s Hall of Fame.” He wrote around 700 songs and more than 100 complete scores for shows and films in a career lasting from 1902 until his death. Jerome Kern was born in New York City. His parents named him Jerome because they lived near Jerome Park, a favourite place of theirs (Jerome Park was named after Leonard Jerome, who was the father of Jennie Jerome, mother of British Prime Minister Winston Churchill). He grew up on East 56th Street in Midtown Manhattan, where he attended public schools. He studied at the New York College of Music and then in Heidelberg, Germany. When he came back to New York, he started working as a rehearsal pianist, but it didn't take long for him to become a prominent and renowned composer. By 1915, he was represented in many Broadway shows. In 1920, he wrote "Look for the Silver Lining" for the musical Sally. 1925 was a major turning point in Kern's career, for he met Oscar Hammerstein II, with whom he would entertain a lifelong friendship and collaboration. Their first show (written together with Otto Harbach) was Sunny. Together, they produced next the famous Show Boat in 1927, which includes the well-known songs "Ol' Man River" and "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man". The musical Roberta (1933) gave us "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes". In 1935, Jerome Kern moved to Hollywood and started working on music for films but continued working on Broadway productions, too. His last Broadway show was the rather unsuccessful Very Warm For May in 1939; the score included another Kern-Hammerstein classic, "All The Things You Are". Kern's Hollywood career was successful indeed. For Swing Time (starring Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire), he wrote "The Way You Look Tonight" (lyrics - Dorothy Fields), which won the Academy Award in 1936 for the best song. In 1941, he and Hammerstein wrote "The Last Time I Saw Paris", a homage to the French city just recently occupied by the Germans. The song was introduced in the movie Lady Be Good and won another Oscar for Best Song. Jerome Kern died at the age of 60 in New York. Kern Drive is named for him, but it used to be an asparagus field.

Kerry Lane
- Kerry Lane is named after a family who owns a company called Kerry Fire Protection. It is an Irish name meaning ciar. The word means "dark" and probably implies "dark hair and brown eyes. County Kerry means "the land of the descendant of Ciar" who was the love-child of the High King Fergus Mac Roth and the legendary Queen Maebh.

Kessler Farm Drive - Kessler Farm Drive is named after the family that owned Kessler Farm. Currently, the farm is owned by George Kessler and used to be a rolling farmland off of Nashua’s Amherst Street. The milk barn was later converted into the First NH bank branch and is now the Ground Round restaurant.

Killian Drive - Killian Drive is named after a family that had descendants in Nashua NH and many who settled throughout the New England region. The family has Irish and German descendent and is also known as Killion. Two of the classic sources of information on Irish surnames are the books by Rev. Patrick Woulfe and by Edward MacLysaght. Rev. Patrick Woulfe's book was Irish Names and Surnames, written in 1923. Woulfe maintains that the name comes from O Killane, Killane, Killan, Killian, Killion; 'descendant of Cillean' (diminutive of Ceallac); a var. in Clare and Galway of Ó Cillín, q.v. or O Killine, O Killen, Killeen, Killen, Killian, Killion; 'descendant. of Cillín' (a 'pet' diminutive of Ceallac, war); the name of several distinct families in different parts of the country, as Clare, Galway, Mayo, Westmeath, Offaly, Kildare and Down, in all of which it is still extent. In his book More Irish Families, Edward MacLysaght equates the names Killeen and Killian, and gives their origin as the Irish form Ó Cillín. MacKILLEN is from Ó Cillín, anglicized Killeen, usually without the prefix O, belongs both by historical association and by present day location to the west of Ireland, being found in the three Atlantic seaboard counties, Clare, Galway and Mayo. In successive centuries - 1143 (Four Masters), 1585 (Composition Book of Connacht), 1655 (Book of Survey and Distribution - Killeens are recorded as residing at or near Ballykileen which is in the parish of Annagh, Co. Mayo, while more than a century later in 1783 the Galway Wardenship Mss. record Killeens as resident at Ballinrobe in the same county. The surname first occurs as early as A.D. 964 in the person of Cormac O'Killeen, Bishop of Clonmacnois; in 1106 his namesake was archdeacon of that diocese; in 1026 Conell O'Cilline is recorded as succesor of Cronan of Tuamgraney, Co. Clare. Some families which crossed the Shannon and settled in Co. Westmeath use the form Killian. Woulfe is usually reliable and accurate but I think he might be mistaken in equating Killen with Killeen. Killen is probably simply MacKillen without the prefix. Both these belong chiefly to Antrim, the Irish form being MacCoilín or MacCailin, a galloglass family brought from Scotland by the O'Donnells in the fifteenth century. It is true that the enumerators recorded O'Killin as one of the more numerous Irish names in Co. Down in 1659, but they frequently confused the prefixes O and Mac and it is more probable that the family so described were really MacKillens. In north-east Ulster MacKillen may be confused with MacQuillan. There were several mediaeval ecclaisiastical dignitaries in Connacht called O'Killeen. In our own time Dr. John Killeen, Bishop of Port Augusta (now Port Pirie), is remembered for his help in combating the "Black & Tan" campaign. Two Belfast men, Rev. Thomas Young Killen (1826-1886) and Rev. William Dore Killen (1806-1902) were notable as leading Presbyterians; also from Co. Antrim was James Bryce Killen (1845-1916), the Fenian and cofounder with Michael Davitt of the Land League; another Fenian was the New York lawyer Dorian Killian; and going back to an earlier insurrection there was John Killen, who was most unjustly hanged in 1803 for his alleged complicity in Robert Emmet's attempt.

Kim Drive - Kim Drive is named after a family that was centered in Pittsburgh, originally from Scotland. Some of the descendants came to settle in other areas throughout New England.

King Street
- King Street is named after Aaron King, who was born in Palmer, Massachusetts on June 22, 1818 and died in Nashua October 3, 1888. He was a passenger conductor for the Worcester and Nashua railroad, covering the road for nineteen years. In 1870, he helped to build the Nashua and Rochester road as appointed construction agent. Interested in the people of Nashua, Mr. King gave his money and influence so that Nashua would be prosperous. He later joined the Pearl Street Congregational Church and was also accepted to the Scottish Rite. According to those who knew him, he was too modest to seek public office. He married Elizabeth Ramsdell on September 1, 1852.

Kingston Drive - Kingston Drive is named after Kingston, (population 600,000) the capital of Jamaica and it is located southeast of the country. It is settled in a natural harbour, protected by the Palisadoes, a long sandspit which connects Port Royal and the Norman Manley International Airport to the rest of the island. Note that Kingston the city (often called Greater Kingston or the "Corporate Area") is much larger than the Parish of Kingston (that includes only the old Downtown and Port Royal). Much of the "Corporate Area" is situated in the Parish of Street Andrew. Founded in 1693 by the British, after a disastrous earthquake destroyed much of the previous capital of Port Royal (French for King's Port), the city became the seat of administration for Jamaica in 1872, keeping the status when the island was granted independence in 1962. On January 14, 1907 an earthquake in Kingston killed more than 1,000 people. Apart from being the seat of the Jamaican Government, the city is also home to the Mona campus of the University of the West Indies founded in 1948. Several annual and well-visited festivals are held in Kingston. Two parts comprise the central area of Kingston - Downtown, which is its historic yet troubled part and New Kingston, which is home to the city's most visited attraction, the Bob Marley Museum, built at his home. Several other reggae stars, including Buju Banton and Beenie Man, also hail from Kingston. Other attractions include the nearby Hellshire and Lime Cay beaches, the National Gallery of Jamaica, and Devon house, a mansion with adjoining park that once belonged to Jamaica's first black millionaire, as well as the ruins of Port Royal. Kingston is served by Norman Manley International Airport. At Tinson Pen, there is an airport serving flights within Jamaica, including those to Montego Bay. Courtney Walsh (1962-) is a world famous cricketer who was born in Kingston.

Kipling Street - Kipling Street was named for the famous British author Rudyard Kipling. The contractor of this district believed that it would be useful to name all the streets after famous writers and poets. Kipling was born December 30, 1865, in Bombay, and educated in England. From 1882 to 1889 he edited and wrote short stories for the Civil and Military Gazette of Lahore, India. He then published Departmental Ditties (1886), satirical verse dealing with civil and military cantonment life in British colonial India, and a collection of his magazine stories called Plain Tales from the Hills (1887). Kipling’s literary reputation was established by six stories of English life in India, published in India between 1888 and 1889, that revealed his profound identification with, and appreciation for, the land and people of India. Thereafter he traveled extensively in Asia and the U.S., married (1892) Caroline Balestier (1865-1939), an American, lived briefly in Vermont, and finally settled (1903) in England. He was a prolific writer; most of his work attained wide popularity. He received the 1907 Nobel Prize in literature. Kipling died January 18, 1936, in London. Kipling Street is with other streets such as Dickens Street and Thoreau Street.

Kittery Street - This street was named for the town of Kittery, Maine. This town was an influential trader post for Americans during colonial times. It was New Hampshire’s naval shipyard during the early years and it is still an influential tourist post today. The contractor named this street to commemorate the influence it had on American trade.

Kristina Street - The contractor chose to name this street Kristina. This technique is often referred to as the “contractor’s choice” and is named for someone in the family or to sound pleasing.

Kyle Street - The contractor chose to name this street Kyle. This technique is often referred to as the “contractor’s choice” and is named for someone in the family or to sound pleasing.

Kanata Drive - Kanata Drive is named as part of a section of town bearing Indian names. In 1535, two Indian youths told Jacques Cartier about the route to “Kanata.” They were referring to the village of Stadacona; Kanata was simply the Huron-Iroquois Nations word for village, “kanata” to refer to the country he had encountered, Canad. Thus,the close proximity of the Iroquois Road and Huron Drive shows the connection of the name to the Indians.

Karnoustie Way - Karnoustie Way is most likely a variation of the spelling for Carnoustie in Tayside, Scotland. Some sportscasters have spelled Carnoustie as Karnoustie, hence the mix-up. It is a small town (pop.10,200) with golf links at the mouth of the Barry Burn on the east coast of Scotland, in the District of Angus. Golf is recorded as having been played here as early as 1527, which was earlier than at St Andrews, where the first record of golf dates from 1552. The original course was ten holes, crossing and recrossing the burn. The opening of the coastal railway from Dundee to Arbroath in 1838 brought an influx of golfers from as far away as Edinburgh, anxious to tackle the ancient links. This led to a complete restructuring of the course, extended in 1867 by Old Tom Morris, to eighteen holes, which had become the standard. The town of Carnoustie was founded only towards the end of the eighteenth century. In 1890, the Earl of Dalhousie, who owned the land, sold the links to the people of the town to be kept available for their recreation in perpetuity. While the townspeople are the owners, today the links are administered on their behalf by Angus District Council. Two additional courses have since been added - the Burnside Course and the shorter, though equally testing Buddon Links. Carnoustie first played host to The Open Championship in 1931, after modifications to the course by James Braid in 1926. The winner then was Tommy Armour, from Edinburgh, Scotland. Later Open winners at Carnoustie were the Englishman Henry Cotton in 1936, Ben Hogan (USA, in 1953), Gary Player (South Africa, 1968), Tom Watson (USA, 1976) and Paul Lawrie (Aberdeenshire, 1999). In North America, the course is nicknamed "Car-Nasty" due to the famously difficult conditions. The term "Carnoustie effect" dates from the 1999 Open, when many of the world's best players, reared on smooth American courses, were frustrated by the unexpected difficulties of the links. Whereas major championships are usually won by scores well under par, at Carnoustie the winning score in 1999 was six strokes over par. One much-fancied young favorite went straight from the course to his mother's arms in tears. That Open may best be remembered for the epic collapse of French golfer Jean Van de Velde, who needed only a 6 on the par-4 18th hole to win the Open-and proceeded to shoot a triple-bogey 7, eventually losing a playoff to Lawrie. The Open Championship will be played at Carnoustie again in 2007. The "Carnoustie effect" is defined as "that degree of mental and psychic shock experienced on collision with reality by those whose expectations are founded on false assumptions." This being a psychological term, it can of course apply to disillusionment in any area of activity, not just in golf.

Kathy Drive - Kathy Drive is named after Katherine Winn. She was the majorette of the award-winning 1948 VFW military band. She was well known in Nashua as being both peppy and high-spirited.

Katie Lane - On Katie Lane, the first house built was by the White family, whose ancestors lived in the area for quite awhile. William White is credited with inventing the wool washer, wool feeding device, and wool dryer. Great-grandfather Charles F. White was born in 1815 in Hillsborough Co., NH (family knowledge). This was shown on an 1855 "proving up" document on a Washington Territory donation land claim that also revealed that he had a brother, George H. White, and a sister, Sarah Jane White (he had named them as "heirs in law"). These siblings had not accompanied Charles west as his party consisted of wife Elizabeth Buchanan, whom he had married in Indiana, a six year old son, Sylvanus, and a brother-in-law, Michael Buchanan. It is highly likely that the street was named after a daughter or relative.

Keats Street - Keats Street is named after John Keats. He was an English poet born in London (1795-1821). He is considered one of the greatest of English poets a leader in romanticism. His poems include “Ode on a Grecian Urn,” “Ode to a Nightingale,” and “Endymion,” which contains the famous line “A thing of beauty is a joy forever.” The son of a livery stable keeper, Keats attended school at Enfield, where he became the friend of Charles Cowden Clarke, the headmaster's son, who encouraged his early learning. Apprenticed to a surgeon (1811), Keats came to know Leigh Hunt and his literary circle, and in 1816 he gave up surgery to write poetry. His first volume of poems appeared in 1817. It included “I stood tip-toe upon a little hill,” “Sleep and Poetry,” and the famous sonnet “On First Looking into Chapman's Homer.” Endymion, a long poem, was published in 1818. Although faulty in structure, it is nevertheless full of rich imagery and color. Keats returned from a walking tour in the Highlands to find himself attacked in Blackwood's Magazine-an article berated him for belonging to Leigh Hunt's “Cockney school” of poetry-and in the Quarterly Review. The critical assaults of 1818 mark a turning point in Keats's life; he was forced to examine his work more carefully, and as a result the influence of Hunt was diminished. However, these attacks did not contribute to Keats's decline in health and his early death, as Shelley maintained in his elegy “Adonais.” Keats's passionate love for Fanny Brawne seems to have begun in 1818. Fanny's letters to Keats's sister show that her critics' contention that she was a cruel flirt was not true. Only Keats's failing health prevented their marriage. He had contracted tuberculosis, probably from nursing his brother Tom, who died in 1818. With his friend, the artist Joseph Severn, Keats sailed for Italy shortly after the publication of Lamia, Isabella, The Eve of Street Agnes, and Other Poems (1820), which contains most of his important work and is probably the greatest single volume of poetry published in England in the 19th cent. He died in Rome in February, 1821, at the age of 25. In spite of his tragically brief career, Keats is one of the most important English poets. He is also among the most personally appealing. Noble, generous, and sympathetic, he was capable not only of passionate love but also of warm, steadfast friendship. Keats is ranked, with Shelley and Byron, as one of the three great Romantic poets. Such poems as “Ode to a Nightingale,” “Ode on a Grecian Urn,” “To Autumn,” and “Ode on Melancholy” are unequaled for dignity, melody, and richness of sensuous imagery. All of his poetry is filled with a mysterious and elevating sense of beauty and joy. Keats's posthumous pieces include “La Belle Dame sans Merci,” in its way as great an evocation of romantic medievalism as “The Eve of Street Agnes.” Among his sonnets, familiar ones are “When I have fears that I may cease to be” and “Bright star! would I were as steadfast as thou art.” “Lines on the Mermaid Tavern,” “Fancy,” and “Bards of Passion and of Mirth” are delightful short poems. Some of Keats's finest work is in the unfinished epic “Hyperion.” In recent years critical attention has focused on Keats's philosophy, which involves not abstract thought but rather absolute receptivity to experience. This attitude is indicated in his celebrated term “negative capability”-“to let the mind be a thoroughfare for all thought.

Keith Street - Keith Street was named after Jeremiah Keith. He served in the American Revolution and was from Dunstable. He went to Rhode Island as a volunteer with Col. Noah Lovewell.

Kehoe Avenue - Kehoe Avenue bears its name from a family in Nashua NH. Kehoe was once known for its “first class grocery store” here in Nashua. Today, many descendants live in the area.

Kelly Street - Kelly Street is named after a prominent family in New Hampshire, descendants of Moses Kelly (or Kelley) who later moved to Nashua. Moses Kelly settled first in Atkinson, New Hampshire near the limits of Salem. He was one of a committee, chosen on January 13, 1773, to give deeds of the pews in the meeting-house newly erected in Atkinson. The births of his children, except that of his youngest one, were recorded in that town, though two or three of the later ones were born after his removal from Atkinson. "Moses Kelly, gentleman,” of Atkinson, bought from Timothy Ferrin, of Goffstown NH, a tract of land in the latter town on May 7, 1773. He soon afterward removed to this spot and became interested in military matters. He owned a tavern and was a prominent local supporter of the "Sons of Liberty". His tavern, called "Kelley's Tavern" was located at the corner of Mast Road and Libby Street. It was here, in the early days of the Revolutionary War, meetings of the Sons of Liberty took place. Moses Kelly was a selectman and town moderator in Goffstown and was also a delegate to the county congress during the Revolutionary War. During the war he attained the rank of Colonel. As Lieut. Colonel his activities included - enlisted July 1, 1777; 5 days; alarm at Ticonderoga; colonel; enlisted August 6, 1778; 25 days; expedition to Rhode Island. Kelley Falls in Goffstown and Kelley Street in Manchester were both dedicated in his honor. His home is still standing and is the oldest house in the Pinardville section of Goffstown at the intersection of Mast Road and Fairview Street. In Henniker, on July 5, 1777, twenty-two men enlisted to form the larger part of a company known as the Second Company of the 9th New Hampshire regiment of militia, commanded by Col. Moses Kelly of Goffstown. Col. Kelly held the office of High Sheriff of Hillsborough County for thirty years (from 1775 to 1808). He received his appointment under the British Crown. “His appearance in court was imposing, dressed as he was in a scarlet coat, white vest, buff-colored breeches and white top boots. He also wore a cocked hat and a gold hilted sword." From Goffstown, Col. Kelly moved to Hopkington, NH. Many of his descendants live on in his memory.

Kendall Way - Kendall Way is named for an early settler of Dunstable. The last name, Kendall, appears in a local graveyard. The Kendall family has been prominent throughout Nashua history. Hannah Jewett Kendall, a resident of Nashua, died on April 16, 1861. Rebekah, also from Nashua, died on June 10, 1840. Later records indicate that the family moved to Bedford, but Eliza Kendall later married Mr. Emerson, who lived in Nashua. The family made many contributions to the city. J. Norman Kendall invented a machine for cutting elastics for shoes and cutting stiffening for shoes. Another member of the family, P. A. Kendall manufactured and dealt in all kinds of saws on 20 Railroad Square.

Kendrick Street - Kendrick Street is named for a prominent family in Nashua. Rev. William P. Kendrick, who came from Dunstable, had a college education at Harvard. Stephen Kendrick was elected as General Court Representative in 1838. Also, the street could be named for the owner of the famous Kendrick and Tuttle store on the corner of Main and Amherst. Stephen Kendrick ran one of the earliest stores in Nashua where they sold imported English and French woolens. John Kendrick and Stephen Kendrick were part of a meeting to sign a charter from the New Hampshire Legislature for the Nashua Manufacturing Company. John Kendrick took fifteen shares of the company.

Kenmare Road - Kenmare Road is named after a small town (ca. 1200 inhabitants by 2004) in the south of County Kerry, Ireland. Since many of the Irish immigrants might have come from the area, the name comes from this small town. It lies on 2 of the more famous Irish tourist attractions, namely the Ring of Kerry and the Ring of Beara, approximately 22 miles (38 km) from Killarney. Kenmare has a population of 1844 (CSO 2002). The modern town was laid out in about 1670 by the English nobleman Sir William Petty, 1st Marquis of Lansdowne. The three main streets that form a triangle in the centre of the town were called William Street (now called Main Street), Henry Street (after the son of William) and Shelbourne Street, which was named after the Earl of Shelbourne. However, the area has more ancient roots. There is one of the biggest stone circles in Ireland very close to the town showing occupation by Celtic peoples long before English occupation. Vikings are said to have raided the area. Another name for Kenmare is Head of the Sea, which is believed to have been given to the area by the Vikings and translated into the Irish 'Ceann Mara' and hence corrupted by the English into Kenmare. It is rather famous for the lace work of a nunnery situated in town.

Kennedy Street - Kennedy Street was named for John F. Kennedy, who came to Nashua in 1960. He started his campaign trail to the White House with his presidential candidacy announcement in front of City Hall. Later, a bust was put in front of City Hall in memory of the event. The Telegraph reported that it was stolen, but it was recovered from someone’s basement.

Kent Lane - Kent Lane is named for a man that owned a prominent business in Nashua, NH. J. E. Kent sold dry and fancy goods and notions at 23 Factory Street. The store was founded in 1866 and the proprietor was native of New York State, but was well-known personally in Nashua. He served in both branches of the city council, which made him very well respected.

Kern Drive - Kern Drive is named after an American composer, Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 - November 11, 1945) considered to be part of the “Songwriter’s Hall of Fame.” He wrote around 700 songs and more than 100 complete scores for shows and films in a career lasting from 1902 until his death. Jerome Kern was born in New York City. His parents named him Jerome because they lived near Jerome Park, a favourite place of theirs (Jerome Park was named after Leonard Jerome, who was the father of Jennie Jerome, mother of British Prime Minister Winston Churchill). He grew up on East 56th Street in Midtown Manhattan, where he attended public schools. He studied at the New York College of Music and then in Heidelberg, Germany. When he came back to New York, he started working as a rehearsal pianist, but it didn't take long for him to become a prominent and renowned composer. By 1915, he was represented in many Broadway shows. In 1920, he wrote "Look for the Silver Lining" for the musical Sally. 1925 was a major turning point in Kern's career, for he met Oscar Hammerstein II, with whom he would entertain a lifelong friendship and collaboration. Their first show (written together with Otto Harbach) was Sunny. Together, they produced next the famous Show Boat in 1927, which includes the well-known songs "Ol' Man River" and "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man". The musical Roberta (1933) gave us "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes". In 1935, Jerome Kern moved to Hollywood and started working on music for films but continued working on Broadway productions, too. His last Broadway show was the rather unsuccessful Very Warm For May in 1939; the score included another Kern-Hammerstein classic, "All The Things You Are". Kern's Hollywood career was successful indeed. For Swing Time (starring Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire), he wrote "The Way You Look Tonight" (lyrics - Dorothy Fields), which won the Academy Award in 1936 for the best song. In 1941, he and Hammerstein wrote "The Last Time I Saw Paris", a homage to the French city just recently occupied by the Germans. The song was introduced in the movie Lady Be Good and won another Oscar for Best Song. Jerome Kern died at the age of 60 in New York. Kern Drive is named for him, but it used to be an asparagus field.

Kerry Lane - Kerry Lane is named after a family who owns a company called Kerry Fire Protection. It is an Irish name meaning ciar. The word means "dark" and probably implies "dark hair and brown eyes. County Kerry means "the land of the descendant of Ciar" who was the love-child of the High King Fergus Mac Roth and the legendary Queen Maebh.

Kessler Farm Drive - Kessler Farm Drive is named after the family that owned Kessler Farm. Currently, the farm is owned by George Kessler and used to be a rolling farmland off of Nashua’s Amherst Street. The milk barn was later converted into the First NH bank branch and is now the Ground Round restaurant.

Killian Drive - Killian Drive is named after a family that had descendants in Nashua NH and many who settled throughout the New England region. The family has Irish and German descendent and is also known as Killion. Two of the classic sources of information on Irish surnames are the books by Rev. Patrick Woulfe and by Edward MacLysaght. Rev. Patrick Woulfe's book was Irish Names and Surnames, written in 1923. Woulfe maintains that the name comes from O Killane, Killane, Killan, Killian, Killion; 'descendant of Cillean' (diminutive of Ceallac); a var. in Clare and Galway of Ó Cillín, q.v. or O Killine, O Killen, Killeen, Killen, Killian, Killion; 'descendant. of Cillín' (a 'pet' diminutive of Ceallac, war); the name of several distinct families in different parts of the country, as Clare, Galway, Mayo, Westmeath, Offaly, Kildare and Down, in all of which it is still extent. In his book More Irish Families, Edward MacLysaght equates the names Killeen and Killian, and gives their origin as the Irish form Ó Cillín. MacKILLEN is from Ó Cillín, anglicized Killeen, usually without the prefix O, belongs both by historical association and by present day location to the west of Ireland, being found in the three Atlantic seaboard counties, Clare, Galway and Mayo. In successive centuries - 1143 (Four Masters), 1585 (Composition Book of Connacht), 1655 (Book of Survey and Distribution - Killeens are recorded as residing at or near Ballykileen which is in the parish of Annagh, Co. Mayo, while more than a century later in 1783 the Galway Wardenship Mss. record Killeens as resident at Ballinrobe in the same county. The surname first occurs as early as A.D. 964 in the person of Cormac O'Killeen, Bishop of Clonmacnois; in 1106 his namesake was archdeacon of that diocese; in 1026 Conell O'Cilline is recorded as succesor of Cronan of Tuamgraney, Co. Clare. Some families which crossed the Shannon and settled in Co. Westmeath use the form Killian. Woulfe is usually reliable and accurate but I think he might be mistaken in equating Killen with Killeen. Killen is probably simply MacKillen without the prefix. Both these belong chiefly to Antrim, the Irish form being MacCoilín or MacCailin, a galloglass family brought from Scotland by the O'Donnells in the fifteenth century. It is true that the enumerators recorded O'Killin as one of the more numerous Irish names in Co. Down in 1659, but they frequently confused the prefixes O and Mac and it is more probable that the family so described were really MacKillens. In north-east Ulster MacKillen may be confused with MacQuillan. There were several mediaeval ecclaisiastical dignitaries in Connacht called O'Killeen. In our own time Dr. John Killeen, Bishop of Port Augusta (now Port Pirie), is remembered for his help in combating the "Black & Tan" campaign. Two Belfast men, Rev. Thomas Young Killen (1826-1886) and Rev. William Dore Killen (1806-1902) were notable as leading Presbyterians; also from Co. Antrim was James Bryce Killen (1845-1916), the Fenian and cofounder with Michael Davitt of the Land League; another Fenian was the New York lawyer Dorian Killian; and going back to an earlier insurrection there was John Killen, who was most unjustly hanged in 1803 for his alleged complicity in Robert Emmet's attempt.

Kim Drive - Kim Drive is named after a family that was centered in Pittsburgh, originally from Scotland. Some of the descendants came to settle in other areas throughout New England.

King Street - King Street is named after Aaron King, who was born in Palmer, Massachusetts on June 22, 1818 and died in Nashua October 3, 1888. He was a passenger conductor for the Worcester and Nashua railroad, covering the road for nineteen years. In 1870, he helped to build the Nashua and Rochester road as appointed construction agent. Interested in the people of Nashua, Mr. King gave his money and influence so that Nashua would be prosperous. He later joined the Pearl Street Congregational Church and was also accepted to the Scottish Rite. According to those who knew him, he was too modest to seek public office. He married Elizabeth Ramsdell on September 1, 1852.

Kingston Drive - Kingston Drive is named after Kingston, (population 600,000) the capital of Jamaica and it is located southeast of the country. It is settled in a natural harbour, protected by the Palisadoes, a long sandspit which connects Port Royal and the Norman Manley International Airport to the rest of the island. Note that Kingston the city (often called Greater Kingston or the "Corporate Area") is much larger than the Parish of Kingston (that includes only the old Downtown and Port Royal). Much of the "Corporate Area" is situated in the Parish of Street Andrew. Founded in 1693 by the British, after a disastrous earthquake destroyed much of the previous capital of Port Royal (French for King's Port), the city became the seat of administration for Jamaica in 1872, keeping the status when the island was granted independence in 1962. On January 14, 1907 an earthquake in Kingston killed more than 1,000 people. Apart from being the seat of the Jamaican Government, the city is also home to the Mona campus of the University of the West Indies founded in 1948. Several annual and well-visited festivals are held in Kingston. Two parts comprise the central area of Kingston - Downtown, which is its historic yet troubled part and New Kingston, which is home to the city's most visited attraction, the Bob Marley Museum, built at his home. Several other reggae stars, including Buju Banton and Beenie Man, also hail from Kingston. Other attractions include the nearby Hellshire and Lime Cay beaches, the National Gallery of Jamaica, and Devon house, a mansion with adjoining park that once belonged to Jamaica's first black millionaire, as well as the ruins of Port Royal. Kingston is served by Norman Manley International Airport. At Tinson Pen, there is an airport serving flights within Jamaica, including those to Montego Bay. Courtney Walsh (1962-) is a world famous cricketer who was born in Kingston.

Kipling Street - Kipling Street was named for the famous British author Rudyard Kipling. The contractor of this district believed that it would be useful to name all the streets after famous writers and poets. Kipling was born December 30, 1865, in Bombay, and educated in England. From 1882 to 1889 he edited and wrote short stories for the Civil and Military Gazette of Lahore, India. He then published Departmental Ditties (1886), satirical verse dealing with civil and military cantonment life in British colonial India, and a collection of his magazine stories called Plain Tales from the Hills (1887). Kipling’s literary reputation was established by six stories of English life in India, published in India between 1888 and 1889, that revealed his profound identification with, and appreciation for, the land and people of India. Thereafter he traveled extensively in Asia and the U.S., married (1892) Caroline Balestier (1865-1939), an American, lived briefly in Vermont, and finally settled (1903) in England. He was a prolific writer; most of his work attained wide popularity. He received the 1907 Nobel Prize in literature. Kipling died January 18, 1936, in London. Kipling Street is with other streets such as Dickens Street and Thoreau Street.

Kittery Street - This street was named for the town of Kittery, Maine. This town was an influential trader post for Americans during colonial times. It was New Hampshire’s naval shipyard during the early years and it is still an influential tourist post today. The contractor named this street to commemorate the influence it had on American trade.

Kristina Street - The contractor chose to name this street Kristina. This technique is often referred to as the “contractor’s choice” and is named for someone in the family or to sound pleasing.

Kyle Street - The contractor chose to name this street Kyle. This technique is often referred to as the “contractor’s choice” and is named for someone in the family or to sound pleasing.